One of the best ways to widen your audience and maximize your brand’s exposure through Twitter is by using twitter hashtags.

A hashtag is basically just a word with a pound symbol in front of it that you can add to your tweets. The hashtag inside the tweet ends up working as a link that, when you click it, leads to a listing of all the tweets that use that same hashtag.

Your tweet also will be able to be found by other people looking at that hashtag. Using popular hashtags thus gets your tweet seen by more people.

Of course, most of us don’t just care about getting our tweets seen in volume. You also want your tweet to be seen by your target audience. You can do that by choosing relevant twitter hashtags, which are ones that are related to your content or that your target audience may be searching for.

Finding those twitter hashtags that are relevant and also popular is really a tricky business. Luckily, there are now a lot of tools to help you out.

In this article, we’ll discuss some tools you can use to find hashtags to use, or target, on Twitter.

Tools you can use to find Twitter hashtags

Hashtagifyme
Hashtagify.me

An oldy but a goody, Hashtagify.me let’s you enter a hashtag you are thinking of using and it shows you some related hashtags. The circle around the hashtag signifies how popular that hashtag is. Instead of just using one of the hashtags, I like to string together a few to boost the number of impressions the tweet will make.

Keyhole Twitter HashtagsKeyhole.co

Keyhole is a tool to track how well a specific hashtag is doing, as well as to identify who the top users using that hashtag are. I find the latter to be the more valuable information, as once you know who the top tweeters about a keyword are, you can try to get in touch with them and have them promote your content, try to work with them, or at least try to identify what is making that person so successful and then replicate that strategy the best you can. You might want to copy their followers (I use crowdfireapp.com) or copy their hashtags.

Twitter Native Trending HashtagsTwitter Native

What’s “Twitter Native?” I’m referring to the “Trends” box shown on the left side of the Twitter home tab after you log in. Just using the native trending hashtags from Twitter is one of the best ways to maximize your tweet impressions. Those hashtags probably aren’t all that relevant for most people, but there is occasionally something there you can take advantage of, like when a trending topic is related to your niche or maybe it is something very broad, like a holiday.

Sprout Social Twitter Hashtag Trends Report

Sprout Social Trend Report

This one isn’t really useful until you have a thriving Twitter profile, but Sprout Social’s Trend Report is an excellent piece of software for tracking which of your own hashtags are doing well and who is talking about them. Once you have that info, you can refine your hashtag usage and reach out to the top people using your hashtags.

Trendsmap Twitter HashtagsTrendsmap.com

I find Trendsmap to sometimes be useful for targeting local traffic. Trendsmap basically shows you a map of the most popular hashtags in a given local area, like Minneapolis. Sometimes those hashtags are very localized and, by using them, you can get your tweets seen by more locals. If you are a business that relies on local traffic, you of course want to be seen by locals. Using the hashtags that people in your area are talking about can be a good way to do that, even if they aren’t all that related to your subject.

Tagboard Twitter HashtagsTag Board

Basically, tag board gives you a board of Social Media posts that use a given hashtag. This can be useful to see who else is using a hashtag, how they use it, and to see what content they are posting. I find tag board to be a good way to double check whether a hashtag is actually something I should be using.

I recently messed up by using #CRO. I had meant for it to be CRO or Conversion Rate Optimization. While a lot of people do use it that way (which I knew from the past), Twitter recently changed it to mean Croatia in honor of the Croatian Soccer Team at Euro 2016. The hashtag even automatically was given a Croatian flag next to it after it was used. Had I only checked Tag Board before using #CRO, I would have known.

Tweet Binder Twitter HashtagsTweet Binder

This is a similar piece of software to Hashtagify.me. You type in a hashtag and are given a list of related hashtags to use.

Rite TagRite Tag

Really they are a posting service that also optimizes your Twitter and Facebook posts. They also have nice lists of trending twitter hashtags.

Tag DefTag Def

Tag Def not only gives definitions of twitter hashtags, but it also has lists of popular hashtags and lets you search by hashtag to find related popular hashtags to use.

hashtagsorgHashtags.org

Probably one of the more in depth hashtag finding tools, Hashtags.org requires a paid account to use seemingly most of their features. As I am unwilling to pay for something I can do with other tools for free, I don’t really know a whole lot about Hashtags.org, but I do think this is a good piece of software that many people might well want to pay to use.

twitonomyTwitonomy

Provides you with a list of the top 10 twitter hashtags from any given Twitter user. Find someone big in your niche and see what hashtags they use. Then use the same ones.